Vinroc | The Interview

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State your stage name and profession for the record.

DJ Vinroc,  Soundwave Communication Specialist

How long have you been DJing? Do you remember your first DJ gig?

It will be 30 years next year. I did a classmates 6th grade party with one strobe light, one turntable and a crate of records. Of course the promoter/mom stiffed me.

What’s your favorite DJ era in the Bay Area and why?

Right now is amazing. So much talent and the technology is enabling some brilliant music. I mean live remixing and sequencing has diversified talented artists and DJs to do amazing things. We had to do that manually before with just 2 tracks (left turntable/right turntable). Archaic now that I think about it.

You’re on stage in front of all your heroes and you gotta rock a 5 minute all vinyl set to prove your worthiness. What records do you choose?

My heroes would not be impressed by me no matter what records I played. But they’d likely take some shots with me at the bar because of my warm personality.

The Triple Threat DJs have undoubtedly become an institution. Talk about the history and influence y’all have had and what it means to be a part of such an important collective in Bay Area DJ history.

I’m told we’ve had an Influence but I have never really felt personally that I was a major influence. Perhaps the idea of balance between keeping the crowd moving and hard-core turntablism was something that was inevitably going to have to evolve. I don’t know if I can take credit for that as there were other groups out there doing that in their own ways. I do know I’m blessed to have some really talented peers who thought I had what it took to build an idea, a philosophy with them.

Favorite burrito joint?

Papalote of course.

Curry or Kobe?

I prefer Tikka Masala and I don’t eat beef.

What’s one of your favorite places to go unplug and unwind on the West Coast?

Monterey /Carmel area is amazing. I might head to Santa Barbara soon as I’ve only been through there DJing in the past. Time to be a tourista.


“Right now is amazing. So much talent and the technology is enabling some brilliant music.”


What’s a current favorite album you’re listening to now that you think you’ll still be listening to 10 years from now?

It’s a singles based industry just like it was in the 50s. There is rarely a classic album you can listen through now. And since playlists are so brilliantly easy to make now I imagine the future would have me listening to music in that format. So I imagine I’d pull up a playlist from a certain time to remind me of that time a decade ago. Even now I have a playlist I know I built in 2006 of some fave tunes.

Drop some shout outs and where folks can find you on social media.

SoundCloud/thatsthatlabel
SoundCloud/vinroc

GUNSHOTS AND CAMERA SHOTS

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SF ARTIST RAPS ABOUT GUNSHOTS & CAMERA SHOTS

I’m inspired by two things: the idea that we’re out here dying for being ourselves and selfies.
The Nokia 7650 was the first camera phone sold in the US and the jumping off point of a culture. In 2017 we’re able to shoot ourselves from certain angles, edit ourselves to our liking, and put our best selves on display for everyone to see.
Shout outs to social media and the culture of flexing that’s come from it. But those ugly photos are still you. Those ugly angles are still you. And what America deems ugly is still it, despite the angles it chooses to show.
I wanted to make a song that sounded like gunshots and camera shots and this is what we came up with. I am a Bay Area artist by the name of The Boyscout, TORO and this track as well as the entire project was produced by Daoud.

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Throwback Thursday! Oakland, 1974

Old mini documentary about Oakland and police brutality from 1974 featuring some amazing old school footage of the Town. Dig the interviews, take or leave the narration, but these video reels are something to behold. Take a trip back in time to an Oakland of the past but still dealing with many of the same issues.


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Throwback Thursday! Saafir – Light Sleeper

Who remembers this track and video that featured hella Bay, mostly Oakland, footage? Classic Bay Area joint from one of the most revered MCs in the history of Hip-Hop music. Take a trip back and bug out on some real Bay lyricism and hyper creative underground hip-hop production. Don’t sleep!


Here’s the full album:

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Artwork by DREAM (TDK)  ||  REST IN PEACE

FIVE MACHINES AND A TABLE

FIVE MACHINES AND A TABLE

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True Clothing introduced street wear to the upper Haight in 1996. 20 years strong, the shop remains a fixture in a city going through an unflinching state of flux. There’s something so San Francisco about it; something that, when talking to the natives, one gets a clear sense of what the city is losing. The culture is on a time limit. As big business and tech creeps its way in, it routinely forces small business out and at the pulsating heart of San Francisco lies small business, entrepreneurship, a DIY mentality, and an inherent need to look out for our own. Brands that gained popularity both nationally and internationally claim their beginnings at True and when one gets to know the shop and the now booming street wear culture orbiting around it, a sense of family and community is clear. So when San Francisco native and Project Runway contestant Jenni Riccetti proposed an in-store pop up, we gladly opened our doors.


“Brands that gained popularity both nationally and internationally claim their beginnings at True and when one gets to know the shop and the now booming street wear culture orbiting around it, a sense of family and community is clear.”


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“Cozy and Clean,” was the first of many titles for this interview we cheekily spitballed. It’s what she describes her line as. Throughout the course of the interview she sewed fabric live via a sewing machine set up in the shop window. The machine whirred every so often, further illustrating the picture her words painted. Her finished product hung up on a rack by the entrance. Running one’s hands through each piece, it is clear why she described them the way she did. She grew up in the Mission, which may be why her line is so fabric-specific. “Everything is soft”, she mentioned with a deliberate tone; yet another title for this interview which was, too, being sewn together in real time. The Mission is one of the major neighborhoods in the city undergoing a cultural gutting. I brought up its fabric stores, which one could only assume left some sort of impression on her growing up. The neighborhood is also characterized by its murals and graffiti, which explains why her logo is styled like a throwie. It is clear she’s a product of her environment. Her grandfather used to custom-make Italian suits. She describes her childhood as one where she was oblivious as to why her clothes were so original and tailor-made to her fit; ironically enough going on to describe how she had a hard time fitting in socially. She wears herself on her sleeve these days and it is clear her misfit-ness is something she perfected with time.


“The neighborhood is also characterized by its murals and graffiti, which explains why her logo is styled like a throwie.”


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She carries herself with a certain confidence; a genuine immunity to adversity. When talking about how she doesn’t mesh with the fashion-corporate industry of SF she decisively stated “that doesn’t mean I’m not good, that means I’m not them.” A Bay girl at heart, she listed off Mac Dre, The Jacka, Andre Nickatina, and Too $hort among the sounds one would hear coming from her workspace. There’s something about the Bay that insists on being itself. It refuses to compromise for the masses, instead makes the masses conform to it, and I suppose she’s just following tradition. “Not everyone understands a creative mind,” she threw out, suggesting it took time for her weirdness to be seen as uniqueness. Fresh off of her Project Runway appearance and onto her first in-store pop up, Too $hort’s early hustle of selling tapes out of his trunk came to mind when she described her space as just “five machines and a table;” the perfect description of this young woman making big moves with her own two.


“A Bay girl at heart, she listed off Mac Dre, The Jacka, Andre Nickatina, and Too $hort among the sounds one would hear coming from her workspace.”


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Interview and words by Temba Kamara
Check out more from Jenni Riccetti @ www.riccetticlothing.com